foto joao

João Martins

Grant Holder Researcher
Master degree in Industrial Electronics and Computer Engineering

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Current project

Development of bioreactors for tissue engineering applications
Nowadays, tissue engineering operation is being targeted in order that the reconstructed tissues and organs are 100% compatible with the receiver. However, despite researching is focused in this way, we are still far from achieving the goal.
With that, this project focuses on the contribution to accomplish this, trying to simulate a set of stimuli to cells to be subject to their native environment, using it for electrical, magnetic and mechanical stimuli. Therefore, this allows to promote growth and differentiation of cells stimulated as realistic as possible, in its native environment and controlled conditions.

Electromechanical Bioreactor in a real conditions of use

Electromechanical Bioreactor in a real conditions of use

Development of readout electronics for polymer based read-out detectors
X-ray detectors are at this stage in the development phase in order to obtain digital radiographs with a better spatial resolution by reducing the radiation dose. Thus, there are two methods for making these detectors, these methods being known as the direct and indirect method. In the indirect method, a scintillator is placed on top of a photodetector.
With this, will be developed for electronic reading CMOS technology-based polymers. Will be used two methods, as can be seen in the figure below. A first method using a photodetector array and a second method using a camera and analysis software.

Development of readout electronics for polymer based read-out detectors

Left: Photodetector circuit. Right: Analysis software using Matlab. 


 

Foto José Carlos Ferreira

 José Carlos Coelho Ferreira

Research fellow by IAPMEI – Passaporte para o Empreendedorismo, as one of the promoters of the project Nanopaint - design your technology (Develop and commercialize electroactive inks based on nanotechnology, to print flexible sensors to be implemented in textiles, sports area etc...)

Degree in Physics and enrolled in Master Degree in Applied Physics

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Current project

PVDF membranes have an increasing use in fields such as filtration and separators for lithium-ion batteries. The performance of the membrane depends strongly on the microstructure, particularly the porosity and pore size

This work aims to study the dependence of the microstructure of PVDF as a function of the preparation conditions from solution. It will also studied as polymer phase depends on the degree of crystallinity in the conditions of preparation of the membranes. The results obtained are correlated with the phase diagrams obtained by Flory-Huggins theory of polymer solutions for describing the influential parameters, and in particular Hildebrand parameter. The phase diagrams will describe the behavior of the microstructure through the binodal and spinodal curves, knowing the regions where the solution is stable, metastable and unstable.

Fig1.José Carlos Ferreira  Fig2.José Carlos Ferreira

                                         (a)                                                                (b)


(a) The top figure represents the Gibbs free energy as a function of volume fraction of (PVDF-HFP)-DMF polymer solutions. The figure above represents the phase diagram of the same solution. Among the black line and the red line is the meta-stable region where the pore formation occurs. These vary as a function of temperature and volume fraction; (b) Theoretical example of a simulation of the micro-structure of a polymer solution, according to the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the Flory-Huggins theory.


 

photoNelson Castro

Research member and Promoter of TouchINK project (development and commercialize interactive smart printed surfaces based on piezoelectric, piezoresistive and capacitive technologies)
Master degree in Industrial Electronics and Computer Engineering

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Current project

Development and commercialize interactive smart printed surfaces based on piezoelectric, piezoresistive and capacitive technologies
Sensors are rising with a great impact in the printed electronics field. Printed electronics field is becoming attractive to industry due to the low cost of mass production through the print methods currently used, like inkjet and screen printing. The current project aims to develop a controller circuit board for a capacitive printed flexible touchscreen, which can be assembled in an enormous range of applications and potentially create new ones around this disruptive technological base.

project

Left: Capacitive printed matrix diamond shaped using screen printing process. Right Controller developed to read the capacitance change between electrodes and communicate through USB the detected positions through a serial mode communication.


 

Foto Raquel Miranda

 Teresa Raquel Pinto Miranda

Grant Holder Researcher

Master degree in Applied Physics and Degree in Physic and Chemistry

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Current project

Development of poly(vynilidene fluoride) based porous composites for photocatalitic applications

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most important photocatalysts with increasing interest in environmental applications. There are still two main drawbacks concerning the use of TiO2 for pratical photocatalytic applications. The reuse/recycling of TiO2 nanoparticles is time consuming and requires expensive separation/filtering process. The other hindrance of TiO2 is the reduced spectral activation, being only activated by UV radiation (<387 nm) which corresponds to just 3 to 5% of the solar spectrum.
The main focus of my work is to prepare, characterize and test TiO2 photocatalytic nanoparticles and nanoparticles in poly(vynilidene fluoride), PVDF, and/or poly (vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene), PVDF-TrFE, aiming to tackle the mentioned main problems of the actual photocatalytic systems: enabling reuse/recycling and increasing photocatalytic efficiency.